The Website of The Magazine of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Field
Locus Online
   odd frost giants
Sub Menu contents
Monitor

New Books


3rd week June
Cat Adams
Ilona Andrews
Eleanor Arnason
Stephen Baxter
Aimee Bender
Jacqueline Carey
Sara Douglass
Gaiman & Sarrantonio
Tom Holt
Rich Horton
Jones & Bennett
Pat Kelleher
C.E. Murphy
Vicki Pettersson
John Scalzi
Jon Sprunk
Matthew Sturges
Rob Thurman

2nd week June
Holly Black
Sarah Rees Brennan
Jack Campbell
Mark Chadbourn
Diane Duane
Laurell K. Hamilton
Charliane Harris
Robin Hobb
James P. Hogan
Alaya Johnson
Sherrilyn Kenyon
Stephen King
Jane Lindskold
Stephenie Meyer
Susan Beth Pfeffer
Philip Pullman
Michael Scott
Lisa Shearin
Jeri Smith-Ready
Carlos Ruiz Zafón

2010 Directories
2009 Directories




 

* Armstrong, Kelley : The Reckoning
(HarperCollins 978-0-06-166283-6, $17.99, 391pp, hardcover, April 2010)
Darkest Powers #3

Young adult fantasy novel, third in the "Darkest Powers" trilogy following The Summoning (2008) and The Awakening (2009), about a 15-year-old girl and her friends who learn to use their genetically-enhanced supernatural powers as they flee the corporation that created them.
• The publisher's site has this description with its "browse inside" feature.
• Amazon's "search inside" function also includes an excerpt.
• Amazon has over 60 mostly 4- and 5-star reader reviews.

(Mon 28 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

* Arthur, Keri : Moon Sworn
(Dell 978-0-440-24571-1, $7.99, 395pp, mass market paperback, June 2010, cover illustration Juliana Kolesova)
Riley Jenson #9

Urban fantasy novel, ninth in the Riley Jenson series following Full Moon Rising (2006), Kissing Sin (Feb. '07), Tempting Evil (March '07), Dangerous Games (April '07), Embraced by Darkness (August '07), The Darkest Kiss (2008), Deadly Desire (2009), and Bound to Shadows (2009), about a half-vampire, half-werewolf guardian who protects humans from various supernatural races.
• This book concludes the series, as Riley suffers a loss, and amnesia.
• Dell's site has this description with an excerpt.
• Amazon has the Publishers Weekly review, which thinks the book "will sorely disappoint Arthur's fans", but the reader reviews are mostly positive.

(Mon 28 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

* Battis, Jes : Inhuman Resources
(Ace 978-0-441-01884-0, $7.99, 305pp, mass market paperback, June 2010, cover art Timothy Lantz)
OSI #3

Fantasy novel, third OSI novel following Night Child (2008) and A Flash of Hex, about an Occult Special Investigator for Vancouver's Mystical Crime Lab.
• In this book, OSI Tess Corday investigates the homicide of a powerful necromancer.
• The author's posted a blog entry last month describing a contest to give away copies of the book.

(Mon 28 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

+ Canavan, Trudi : The Ambassador's Mission
(Orbit 978-0316037839, $25.99, 513pp, hardcover, May 2010)
Traitor Spy #1 First US edition (UK: Orbit, May 2010)

Fantasy novel, first in the "Traitor Spy" trilogy that follows earlier "Black Magician" trilogy (The Magician's Guild (2001), The Novice (2002), and The High Lord (2003)).
• It concerns Sonea, a Black Magician, whose son Lorkin goes missing on a mission to assist the new Guild Ambassador.
• The publisher's site has this description with an "OpenBook" function.
• The author's site has this extract.
• The UK edition of the book has ranked on Amazon UK's bestseller lists for several weeks (see directory link).
• Amazon has the Booklist review: "Canavan is a good adventure writer, who keeps you turning pages, and she furnishes enough background to obviate reading the preceding Black Magician trilogy to enjoy this book. She's good enough, in fact, to tilt you toward reading it, anyway, if you haven't already."

(Mon 28 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

* Egan, Jennifer : A Visit from the Goon Squad
(Knopf 978-0-307-59283-5, $25.95, 274pp, hardcover, June 2010)

Literary novel about a kleptomaniac woman in contemporary New York and her music producer boss, in a story that moves back and forth in time from the 1970s to 2020.
• The publisher's site has this description with a text excerpt and an author Q&A.
• Amazon has the starred Publishers Weekly review: "Readers will be pleased to discover that the star-crossed marriage of lucid prose and expertly deployed postmodern switcheroos that helped shoot Egan to the top of the genre-bending new school is alive in well in this graceful yet wild novel."
• The Agony Column interviewed the author and published this review: "Egan certainly has a natural talent for speculative fiction. Portions of 'A Visit from the Goon Squad' are evocative stories set in the near future; one notable chapter is written in PowerPoint. Each segment is strong enough to stand on its own -- and Egan has even published the PowerPoint story online..."

(Mon 28 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

* Farnsworth, Christopher : Blood Oath
(Putnam 978-0-399-15635-9, $24.95, 390pp, hardcover, May 2010)
Blood Oath #1

Vampire novel and political thriller, the author's first novel, about a 140-year-old vampire who has been personal aide to the US president since the Andrew Jackson era.
• Book site Blood Oath: Welcome to the War on Horror has a video trailer, excerpts from reviews, and excerpt, and a page of top secret links.
• Amazon has the Publishers Weekly review: "This action-filled debut by scriptwriter Farnsworth reads like a cross between P.N. Elrod's historical vampire adventures and Thomas Greanias's conspiracy thrillers..."
• Michael Berry reviews it for San Francisco Chronicle: "Blood Oath isn't profound, by any means, but it's an enjoyable summertime adventure, a creditable inaugural outing for a new action series."

(Mon 28 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

* Flewelling, Lynn : The White Road
(Ballantine Spectra 978-0-553-59009-8, $7.99, 385pp, mass market paperback, June 2010, cover illustration Michael J. Komarck)
Nightrunner #5

Fantasy novel, fifth book in the "Nightrunner" series following Luck in the Shadows (1996), Stalking Darkness (1997), Traitor's Moon (1999), and Shadows Return (2008).
• In this book master spies Seregil and Alec pursue the secret of a strange magical creature called Sebrahn.
• Bantam's site has this description and an excerpt.
• Amazon has positive reader reviews.

(Mon 28 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

* Graham, Jo : Stealing Fire
(Orbit US 978-0-316-07639-5, $14.99, 306pp, trade paperback, May 2010, cover illustration John Jude Palencar)

Historical fantasy novel set in ancient Egypt, about Lydias, a soldier for Alexander the Great who, after Alexander's death, accepts an assignment from Ptolemy to steal Alexander's body and bring it to Egypt.
• Orbit's blog has this post about the book with a brief description.
• Amazon has the starred Publishers Weekly review: "Lydias embodies perfect devotion, yearning to protect what he loves and mourning those he has failed, and his story will confirm Graham's place in the highest ranks of historical fantasists."

(Mon 28 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

+ Hoffman, Paul : The Left Hand of God
(Dutton 978-0525951315, $25.95, 372pp, hardcover, June 2010)
Left Hand of God #1

Historical fantasy novel, first of a trilogy and apparently the author's first novel, about a teenaged boy who escapes the religious sanctuary where he's been raised, where warrior monks prepare for a holy war.
• The publisher's description calls it a "novel of astonishing scope and imagination" and provides an excerpt.
• Amazon has a Booklist review, which calls it "A rousing trilogy-opener", and somewhat mixed reader reviews.
• Guardian ran this review by Patrick Ness (the UK edition appeared earlier this year): "It's hard to think of anything I've read recently that feels less like a book and more like a product than Paul Hoffman's The Left Hand of God. Arriving on an extraordinary tide of hype -- YouTube trailers, an iPhone app -- it has a very readable, highly buffed sheen, but also an uneasy blending of tones whereby too many demographics are being pitched to at once. It feels calculated -- indeed, it feels as if it's been put through focus groups -- to appeal as broadly as possible, particularly to the teenage crossover readership."

(Mon 28 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

* Kane, Stacia : Unholy Ghosts
(Del Rey 978-0-345-51557-5, $7.99, 339pp, mass market paperback, June 2010, cover illustration Juliana Kolesova)
Downside Ghosts #1

Urban fantasy novel, first of a trilogy, set in a near future about a claim's adjustor for the Church of Real Truth, which compensates citizens bothered by ghosts of the living dead.
• Del Rey's site has this description and an excerpt.
• The author's site has this page with quotes from reviews, a link to an excerpt, and covers of the next two volumes, scheduled at monthly intervals.
• Carolyn Cushman reviewed it in the May issue of Locus Magazine: "[The protagonist is] not your usual heroic protagonist, and this isn't one of your humorous urban fantasies, but rather a lively thriller, full of action and ghostly encounters."

(Mon 28 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

* Koontz, Dean : Frankenstein: Lost Souls
(Bantam 978-0-553-80801-8, $27, 350pp, hardcover, June 2010)
Frankenstein #4

Horror novel, fourth in Koontz' Frankenstein series following Prodigal Son (2005, with Ed Gorman), City of Night (2006, with Kevin J. Anderson), and Dead and Alive (2009).
• In this book Dr. Frankenstein is building humanoid replicants to replace the citizens of a small Montana town.
• The author's site has this page about the book, with a video trailer and a link to a text excerpt.
• Amazon has the Publishers Weekly review, which calls it "goofy, grisly", and mixed reader reviews.
• Stefan Dziemianowicz reviews it in the July issue of Locus Magazine "Dean Koontz, shake hands with Jack Finney. That thought surely is going to cross the minds of more than a few readers who pick up Koontz's fourth entry in his Frankenstein cycle. The series prefix notwithstanding, this book owes a lot more to Finney's The Body Snatchers (1955) than to Mary Shelley's novel..."

(Mon 28 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

* Lalumière, Claude : Objects of Worship
(ChiZine 978-0-9812978-2-8, $16.95, 274pp, trade paperback, November 2009)

Collection of 12 stories, two of them original to this book, with an introduction by James Morrow, an afterword by the author, and illustrations by Rupert Bottenberg.
• The publisher's site has this description with quotes from reviews and links to online sources of two of the stories.
• Amazon has the Publishers Weekly review: "The strange is matter-of-factly mundane in Canadian author and editor Lalumière's collection of 10 reprinted and two original stories of the surreal and fantastic. ... Even when the plots aren't quite enough to carry Lalumière's curious ideas, they're still intensely memorable."
• This is one of several ChiZine titles from 2008 and 2009 that have appeared, belatedly, in Borders bookstores.

(Tue 22 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

* McDonald, Ian : The Dervish House
(Pyr 978-1-61614-204-9, $26, 359pp, hardcover, June 2010, cover illustration Stephan Martiniere)

SF novel set in 2027 Istanbul, concerning terrorism and nanotech in the interconnected lives of six characters over a period of five days.
• Pyr's website has this description.
• Tor.com has posted a preview chapter.
• Gary K. Wolfe's review is in the July isue of Locus Magazine, grouping this novel with McDonald's River of Gods and Brasyl as an "impressive series of near-future tech revolutions in large-scale developing economies like India, Brazil, [and] now Turkey." Wolfe comments, "The near-future settings lend these novels a considerable sense of immediacy, but also show that McDonald shares the classic hard-SF optimism about how quickly the revolution will arrive. ... [That] McDonald manages to pack all these characters, complete with complex backstories, into a moderate-size novel already dense with political and economic ideas, genuinely compelling SF inventions, and at least one Sax Rohmer subplot involving ancient legends, Islamic mysticism, and subterranean chambers, is something of a marvel."

(Fri 25 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

+ Miéville, China : Kraken
(Ballantine Del Rey 9780-345-49749-9, $26, 509pp, hardcover, July 2010) First US edition (UK: Macmillan UK, May 2010)

Fantasy novel about the disappearance of a huge squid specimen from London's Natural History Museum.
• Del Rey's site this description with an excerpt.
• Amazon has the Publishers Weekly review: "British fantasist Miéville mashes up cop drama, cults, popular culture, magic, and gods in a Lovecraftian New Weird caper sure to delight fans...", and somewhat mixed reader reviews.
• Gary K. Wolfe's review from Locus Magazine is posted in its entirety; "Sometimes utterly chilling and sometimes very funny, it is one of the first fantasy novels I've seen to successfully combine elements of everything from the Victorian terror-tale to surrealism and Pynchonesque absurdity, and a good deal in between."
• Faren Miller's review appears in the July issue of Locus: "Juggling influences as varied as Chandler, Lovecraft, 'sci-fi' tech and bits of old religions, Kraken proves to be witty and suspenseful, flatout crazy and quite addictive. Buckle down for a long, delirious read!"

(Wed 30 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

* Moyer, Jaime Lee : The 2010 Rhysling Anthology
(SFPA 978-0-9819643-2-4, $12.95, 155pp, trade paperback, June 2010)

Anthology, subtitled "The Best Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Poetry of 2009", of 58 short poems and 32 long poems first published last year and eligible for this year's Rhysling Awards as selected by the Science Fiction Poetry Association.
• Authors include Duane Ackerson, Mike Allen, Robert Borski, Bruce Boston, G.O. Clark, Neil Gaiman, Geoffrey A. Landis, Mark Rich, Marge Simon, Gemma Files, and W. Gregory Stewart.
• SFPA's website has the complete table of contents.

(Mon 21 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

* Rabuzzi, Daniel A. : The Choir Boats
(Chizine Publications 978-0-9809410-7-4, $16.95, 406pp, trade paperback, September 2009)
Longing for Yount #1

Historical fantasy novel, first of the "Longing for Yount" trilogy, about a merchant in 1821 London who embarks on a voyage to the unearthly land of Yount.
• The publisher's site has this description with quotes from reviews and links to samples of the illustrations by Deborah Mills and to text and PDF excerpts.
• Amazon quotes Faren Miller's review from the January '10 issue of Locus Magazine: "Holding a doctorate in history, Rabuzzi knows his stuff, but the knowledge enlivens the language while his wit and his love of literature keep him from overwhelming us with needless data. ... Both the voyage and the arrival are adventurous, filled with perils and continuing uncertainty about just who or what might be Evil in a deliciously convoluted tale. While it ends with much left unresolved, The Choir Boats is a strong opening to what could be a remarkable project."

(Tue 22 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

* Wiersema, Robert J. : The World More Full of Weeping
(ChiZine 978-0-9809410-9-8, $10.95, 101pp, trade paperback, October 2009, cover art Erik Mohr)

Horror novella about an 11-year-old boy who makes supernatural discoveries in the woods behind his British Columbia home.
• The publisher's site has this page about the book, with quotes from numerous reviews.
• Amazon's "Look Inside" function provides an excerpt. Amazon has the Publishers Weekly review: "Wiersema's novella seamlessly blends literary fiction with mythic fantasy to create a lyrical, surreal and deeply melancholic reading experience."
• Tim Pratt reviewed it in the April '10 issue of Locus Magazine, calling it "a moving character study about grief and lost possibilities, and also a love song to the Canadian wilderness of British Columbia."

(Tue 22 Jun 2010) • Purchase this book from Amazon | BookSense • (Directory Entry)

|

New SF/F/H books:
last week June 2010

posted 2 July 2010




2010 Novels, Sort Counts
Stand-alones Sequels and Series totals
SF Novels 30 46 76
Fantasy Novels 23 125 148
Horror Novels 8 4 12
totals 61 175 236
See Directory 1a for sorted lists
See Directory 1b for 2010 first novels seen so far this year




Opening lines:

An everyday doomsayer in sandwich-board abruptly walked away from what over the last several days had been his pitch, by the gates of a museum. The sign on his front was an old-school prophecy of the end: the one bobbing on his back read forget it.




Opening lines:

The white bird climbs above the city of Istanbul: a stork, riding the rising air in a spiral of black-tipped wings. A flare of the feathers; it wheels on the exhalations of twenty million people, one among ten thousand that have followed the invisible terrain of thermals from Africa to Europe, gliding one to the next, rising up from Lake Victoria and the Rift Valley, following the silver line of the Nile, across the Sinai and the Lebanon to the great quadrilateral of Asian Minor. There the migration splits.




Opening lines:

It began the usual way, in the bathroom of the Lassimo Hotel. Sasha was adjusting her yellow eye shadow in the mirror when she noticed a bag on the floor beside the sink that must have belonged to the woman whose peeing she could faintly hear through the vaultlike door of a toilet stall. Inside the rim of the bag, barely visible, was a wallet made of pale green leather. It was easy for Sasha to recognize, looking back, that the peeing woman's blind trust had provoked her: We live in a city where people will steal the hair off your head if you give them half a chance, but you leave your stuff lying in plain sight and expect it to be waiting for you when you come back? It made her want to teach the woman a lesson. But this wish only camouflaged the deeper feeling Sasha always had: that at, tender wallet, offering itself to her hand-it seemed so dull, so life-as-usual to just leave it there rather than seize the moment, accept the challenge, take the leap, fly the coop, throw caution to the wind, live dangerously ("I get it," Coz, her therapist, said), and take the fucking thing.




This page lists selected newly published science fiction, fantasy, and horror books seen by Locus Online. (Locus Online does not have access to materials sent to Locus Magazine).

Review copies received will be listed (though reprints and reissues are on other pages), but not galleys or advance reading copies. Selections, some based only on bookstore sightings, are at the discretion of Locus Online.

* = first edition
+ = first US edition

Date with publisher info is official publication month; date in parentheses at paragraph end is date seen or received.






   
Locus Online is an associate of Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk. Your purchase of books through these links (click on titles or covers) helps support Locus Online.


© 2010 by Locus Publications. All rights reserved.