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Awards Calendar

2015 winners

2015 finalists:

2014 winners:


2013 Winners


[* links to sfadb pages with nominee indexing and cover images]







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This blog is hosted by WordPress beginning April 2010, with re-initialized categories and tags. Labels listed below apply to the earlier, Blogger-hosted posts.

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Ellison Wins Prometheus Hall of Fame Award

The Libertarian Futurist Society has announced the Prometheus Award Hall of Fame winner:

  • “‘Repent, Harlequin!’ Said the Ticktockman”, Harlan Ellison (1965)
  • “Sam Hall”, Poul Anderson (1953)
  • Falling Free, Lois McMaster Bujold (1988)
  • Courtship Rite, Donald M. Kingsbury (1982)
  • “As Easy as A.B.C.”, Rudyard Kipling (1912)

This category honors novels, novellas, stories, graphic novels, anthologies, films, TV shows/series, plays, poems, music recordings, and other works of fiction first published or broadcast more than five years ago.

The award ceremony will take place May 9, 2015 at Marcon in Columbus OH. For more information see the LFS website.

K.J. Parker’s Identity Revealed

The pseudonymous World Fantasy Award-winning author K.J. Parker revealed his true identity, humorous fantasy writer Tom Holt, in a conversation with Locus‘s own Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe, on their Coode Street Podcast. You can listen to the interview here.

Holt, 53, began publishing as K.J. Parker in 1998 with Colours in the Steel and has produced over a dozen novels under that name, along with acclaimed short fiction and novellas. Holt’s fiction career under his own name began with Expecting Someone Taller (1987) and has continued in parallel with the Parker works.

Black Gate Declines Hugo Nomination

Black Gate, nominated for a 2015 Hugo Award in the fanzine category, has withdrawn from the awards ballot as of Saturday April 18th, 2015.

In his announcement, editor John O’Neill explained, “Black Gate has, for the past two weeks, been debating the very legitimacy of the current Hugo ballot, and I have been publicly and privately advocating a ‘No Award’ approach. I have also come to the conclusion, reluctantly, that this goes against the spirit of the awards. We can’t both be a part of the ballot, and actively working against it.”

Sasquan had previously announced that “the ballot is now going to the printer and there will be no further revisions.” Administrator John Lorentz confirmed that: “The ballot is indeed locked, and Black Gate will remain on the ballot. (That’s because the ballot is already at the printer and we can’t change it anymore.)”

For more on Black Gate‘s withdrawal, see their official website.

 

2014 RT Awards Winners

Several titles and authors of genre interest are among the 2014 Romantic Times Reviewers’ Choice and Career Achievement Awards winners.

For Career Achievement, Cecilia Tan won in the Erotic Romance sub-category, Kathy Reichs won for Mystery, Walter Dean Myers won for Young Adult, Amanda Ashley won for Paranormal Romance, Sharon Sala won for Romantic Suspense, C.J. Cherryh won for Science Fiction & Fantasy, and Urban Fantasy went to Patricia Briggs.

In Historical Romance, Diana Gabaldon’s Written in My Own Heart’s Blood (Random House) won the Historical Fiction sub-category.

The Paranormal/Urban Fantasy sub-categories and winners are:

Steampunk: Dawn’s Early Light, Pip Ballantine & Tee Morris (Ace)

Paranormal Romance: Bitter Spirits, Jenn Bennett (Berkley)

Paranormal Worldbuilding: The Descent, Alma Katsu (Gallery)

Fantasy Romance: Entreat Me, Grace Draven (Self-published)

Futuristic Romance: Born of Fury, Sherrilyn Kenyon (St. Martin’s)

Urban Fantasy Novel: Magic Breaks, Ilona Andrews (Ace)

Urban Fantasy Worldbuilding: Up From the Grave, Jeaniene Frost (Avon)

Self-Pub Urban Fantasy: Broken Blade, J.C. Daniels (Shiloh Walker)

In the Romantic Suspense category, Christina Dodd’s Virtue Falls (St. Martin’s) won for Paranormal Romantic Suspense.

In the Mystery/ Suspense/ Thriller category, One Potion in the Grave (NAL) by Heather Blake won for Amateur Sleuth.

In Young Adult/New Adult, Dreams of Gods & Monsters (Little, Brown) by Laini Taylor won for YA Fantasy, and The Iron Trial (Scholastic) by Holly Black & Cassandra Clare won for Middle Grade Protagonist.

Winners in sub-categories of Science Fiction/Fantasy are:

Science Fiction: Valley of Fires, J. Barton Mitchell (Thomas Dunne)

Fantasy: My Real Children, Jo Walton (Tor)

Epic Fantasy: The Widow’s House, Daniel Abraham (Orbit)

Fantasy Adventure: Daring, Elliott James (Orbit)

The awards ceremony will take place at the RT Booklovers Convention at the Hyatt Regency Dallas in Dallas, TX May 12-17, 2015. For the complete list of categories, sub-categories, and winners, see the announcement on the RT Book Reviews website.

 

 

 

2015 Hugo Awards Ballot, Further Revised

Sasquan, the 73rd World Science Fiction Convention, has announced further changes to the Hugo Awards ballot.

As previously announced, Markos Kloos withdrew his novel Lines of Departure (47North) from consideration, as did Annie Bellet for her story “Goodnight Stars” (The End is Now). As a result, Cixin Liu’s The Three-Body Problem (translated by Ken Liu, Tor) and Steven Diamond’s “A Single Samurai” (The Baen Big Book of Monsters) have been added to the ballot in the novel and short story categories, respectively.

Prior revisions to the Hugo Awards ballot include entries for best novelette and best professional artist, removed due to ineligibility. “Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus” by John C. Wright (The Book of Feasts & Seasons) was replaced by Thomas Olde Heuvelt’s “The Day the World Turned Upside Down” (Lightspeed 4/14), and artist Jon Eno was replaced by Kirk DouPonce.

The Hugo Awards administrators have announced, “The ballot is now going to the printer and there will be no further revisions.”

The revised Hugo Awards Ballot and the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer are below.

Best Novel (1,827 nominating ballots)

Best Novella (1,083)

Best Novelette (1,031)

  • “The Journeyman: In the Stone House”, Michael F. Flynn (Analog 6/14)
  • “The Day the World Turned Upside Down”, Thomas Olde Heuvelt (Lightspeed 4/14)
  • “Championship B’tok”, Edward M. Lerner (Analog 9/14)
  • “Ashes to Ashes, Dust to Dust, Earth to Alluvium”, Gray Rinehart (Orson Scott Card’s InterGalactic Medicine Show 5/14)
  • “The Triple Sun: A Golden Age Tale”, Rajnar Vajra (Analog 7-8/14)

Best Short Story (1,174)

Best Dramatic Presentation – Long (1,285)

  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier
  • Edge of Tomorrow
  • Guardians of the Galaxy
  • Interstellar
  • The Lego Movie

Best Dramatic Presentation – Short (938)

  • Doctor Who: “Listen”
  • The Flash: “Pilot”
  • Game of Thrones: “The Mountain and the Viper”
  • Grimm: “Once We Were Gods”
  • Orphan Black: “By Means Which Have Never Yet Been Tried”

Best Related Work (1,150)

Best Graphic Story (785)

Best Professional Editor Long Form (712)

  • Vox Day
  • Sheila Gilbert
  • Jim Minz
  • Anne Sowards
  • Toni Weisskopf

Best Professional Editor Short Form (870)

  • Jennifer Brozek
  • Vox Day
  • Mike Resnick
  • Bryan Thomas Schmidt
  • Edmund R. Schubert

Best Professional Artist (753)

  • Julie Dillon
  • Kirk DouPonce
  • Nick Greenwood
  • Alan Pollack
  • Carter Reid

Best Semiprozine (660)

  • Abyss & Apex
  • Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine
  • Beneath Ceaseless Skies
  • Lightspeed
  • Strange Horizons

Best Fanzine (576)

  • Black Gate
  • Elitist Book Reviews
  • Journey Planet
  • The Revenge of Hump Day
  • Tangent Online

Best Fancast (668)

  • Adventures in SciFi Publishing
  • Dungeon Crawlers Radio
  • Galactic Suburbia Podcast
  • The Sci Phi Show
  • Tea and Jeopardy

Best Fan Writer (777)

  • Dave Freer
  • Amanda S. Green
  • Jeffro Johnson
  • Laura J. Mixon
  • Cedar Sanderson

Best Fan Artist (296)

  • Ninni Aalto
  • Brad Foster
  • Elizabeth Leggett
  • Spring Schoenhuth
  • Steve Stiles

John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer [Not a Hugo Award] (851)

  • *Wesley Chu
  • Jason Cordova
  • *Kary English
  • Rolf Nelson
  • Eric. S. Raymond

*Finalists in their 2nd year of eligibility.

There were 2,122 nominating ballots received from members of LonCon 3, Sasquan, and MidAmeriCon II.

Sasquan, the 73rd World Science Fiction Convention, will be held in Spokane WA, August 19-23, 2015.

Hugo Awards Withdrawals

Two Hugo Awards finalists have withdrawn their titles from consideration, and multiple Hugo Award winner Connie Willis has declined the offer to present awards this year. Their statements on the matter follow.

Markos Kloos has withdrawn his Hugo Award-nominated novel Lines of Departure (47North) from consideration for this year’s award. Kloos explains in a blog post:

It has come to my attention that “Lines of Departure” was one of the nomination suggestions in Vox Day’s “Rabid Puppies” campaign. Therefore — and regardless of who else has recommended the novel for award consideration — the presence of “Lines of Departure” on the shortlist is almost certainly due to my inclusion on the “Rabid Puppies” slate. For that reason, I had no choice but to withdraw my acceptance of the nomination. I cannot in good conscience accept an award nomination that I feel I may not have earned solely with the quality of the nominated work.

Annie Bellet has withdrawn her nominated story “Goodnight Stars” (The End is Now) from consideration. On her blog, she explains:

I am withdrawing because this has become about something very different than great science fiction. I find my story, and by extension myself, stuck in a game of political dodge ball, where I’m both a conscripted player and also a ball. (Wrap your head around that analogy, if you can, ha!) All joy that might have come from this nomination has been co-opted, ruined, or sapped away. This is not about celebrating good writing anymore, and I don’t want to be a part of what it has become.

Multiple Hugo Award winner Connie Willis has posted at length about her decision not to present trophies at this year’s Hugo Award ceremony. Her post reads, in part,

You may or may not have heard of the Hugo crisis currently facing the science-fiction community. (If you haven’t, I recommend Susan Grigsby’s excellent article on Daily Kos entitled, “Freeping the Hugo Awards.”) Basically, what’s happened is that a small group of people led by Vox Day/Theodore Beale and Brad Torgerson took advantage of the fact that only a small percentage of Hugo voters nominate works to hijack the ballot. They got members of their group to buy supporting memberships and all vote for a slate of people they decided should be on it. Since everybody else just nominates what they like, and those choices vary quite a bit, nobody else stood a chance, and the ballot consists almost entirely of their slate.

When I heard about this, I was sick at the thought of what they’d done and at all the damage they’d caused — to the nominees who should have made it on the ballot and didn’t; to those who’d made it on and would now have to decide whether to stay on the ballot or refuse the nomination; of the innocent nominees who got put on Vox Day’s slate without their knowledge and were now unfairly tarred by their association with it; and to the Hugo Awards themselves and their reputation.

But I didn’t want to speak out and refuse to be a presenter if there was still a chance to salvage the Hugo Awards ceremony. I wanted to do it if I could for the sake of the nominees who were on the ballot honestly and for the sake of the people putting on the Worldcon. And for the poor emcees who had the terrible luck to be chosen to host the awards this year and have watched what should have been one of the highlights of their careers turn into a nightmare. David Gerrold is an old and dear friend. The last thing I wanted to do was let him down. Plus, I’ve generally found that wading in to controversies with your two cents’ worth (even if you’re personally involved and were onstage when they happened) only tends to make things worse, not better.

But then Vox Day and his followers made it impossible for me to remain silent , keep calm, and carry on. Not content with just using dirty tricks to get on the ballot, they’re now demanding they win, too, or they’ll destroy the Hugos altogether. When a commenter on File 770 suggested people fight back by voting for “No Award,” Vox Day wrote: “If No Award takes a fiction category, you will likely never see another award given in that category again. The sword cuts both ways, Lois. We are prepared for all eventualities.”

I assume that means they intend to use the same bloc-voting technique to block anyone but their nominees from winning in future years. Or, in other words, “If you ever want to see your precious award again, do exactly as I say.” It’s a threat, pure and simple. Everyone who votes has been ordered (under the threat of violence being done to something we love) to let their stories — stories which got on the ballot dishonestly — win.

In my own particular case, I feel I’ve also been ordered to go along with them and act as if this were an ordinary Hugo Awards ceremony. I’ve essentially been told to engage in some light-hearted banter with the nominees, give one of them the award, and by my presence — and my silence — lend cover and credibility to winners who got the award through bullying and extortion.

Well, I won’t do it. I can’t do it. If I did, I’d be collaborating with them in their scheme.

2015 Hugo Awards Ballot, Revised Version

[Note: The ballot was further revised on April 17, 2015. The final version of the ballot is here.]

The Hugo Awards ballot entries for best novelette and best professional artist have been revised due to ineligibility. “Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus” by John C. Wright (The Book of Feasts & Seasons) has been replaced by Thomas Olde Heuvelt’s “The Day The World Turned Upside Down” (Lightspeed 4/14); and artist Jon Eno has been replaced by Kirk DouPonce.

The revised Hugo Awards Ballot and the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer are below, as announced by Sasquan, the 73rd World Science Fiction Convention, which will be held in Spokane WA, August 19-23, 2015.

Best Novel (1,827 nominating ballots)

Best Novella (1,083)

Best Novelette (1,031)

  • “The Journeyman: In the Stone House”, Michael F. Flynn (Analog 6/14)
  • “The Day the World Turned Upside Down”, Thomas Olde Heuvelt (Lightspeed 4/14)
  • “Championship B’tok”, Edward M. Lerner (Analog 9/14)
  • “Ashes to Ashes, Dust to Dust, Earth to Alluvium”, Gray Rinehart (Orson Scott Card’s InterGalactic Medicine Show 5/14)
  • “The Triple Sun: A Golden Age Tale”, Rajnar Vajra (Analog 7-8/14)

Best Short Story (1,174)

  • “On a Spiritual Plain”, Lou Antonelli (Sci Phi Journal #2 11/14)
  • “Goodnight Stars”, Annie Bellet (The End is Now)
  • “Totaled”, Kary English (Galaxy’s Edge 7/14)
  • “Turncoat”, Steve Rzasa (Riding the Red Horse)
  • “The Parliament of Beasts and Birds”, John C. Wright (The Book of Feasts & Seasons)

Best Dramatic Presentation – Long (1,285)

  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier
  • Edge of Tomorrow
  • Guardians of the Galaxy
  • Interstellar
  • The Lego Movie

Best Dramatic Presentation – Short (938)

  • Doctor Who: “Listen”
  • The Flash: “Pilot”
  • Game of Thrones: “The Mountain and the Viper”
  • Grimm: “Once We Were Gods”
  • Orphan Black: “By Means Which Have Never Yet Been Tried”

Best Related Work (1,150)

Best Graphic Story (785)

Best Professional Editor Long Form (712)

  • Vox Day
  • Sheila Gilbert
  • Jim Minz
  • Anne Sowards
  • Toni Weisskopf

Best Professional Editor Short Form (870)

  • Jennifer Brozek
  • Vox Day
  • Mike Resnick
  • Bryan Thomas Schmidt
  • Edmund R. Schubert

Best Professional Artist (753)

  • Julie Dillon
  • Kirk DouPonce
  • Nick Greenwood
  • Alan Pollack
  • Carter Reid

Best Semiprozine (660)

  • Abyss & Apex
  • Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine
  • Beneath Ceaseless Skies
  • Lightspeed
  • Strange Horizons

Best Fanzine (576)

  • Black Gate
  • Elitist Book Reviews
  • Journey Planet
  • The Revenge of Hump Day
  • Tangent Online

Best Fancast (668)

  • Adventures in SciFi Publishing
  • Dungeon Crawlers Radio
  • Galactic Suburbia Podcast
  • The Sci Phi Show
  • Tea and Jeopardy

Best Fan Writer (777)

  • Dave Freer
  • Amanda S. Green
  • Jeffro Johnson
  • Laura J. Mixon
  • Cedar Sanderson

Best Fan Artist (296)

  • Ninni Aalto
  • Brad Foster
  • Elizabeth Leggett
  • Spring Schoenhuth
  • Steve Stiles

John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer [Not a Hugo Award] (851)

  • *Wesley Chu
  • Jason Cordova
  • *Kary English
  • Rolf Nelson
  • Eric. S. Raymond

*Finalists in their 2nd year of eligibility.

There were 2,122 nominating ballots received from members of LonCon 3, Sasquan, and MidAmeriCon II.

2014 Aurealis Awards Winners

The winners have been announced for the 2014 Aurealis Awards, honoring SF, fantasy, and horror by Australians:

BEST FANTASY NOVEL

  • Dreamer’s Pool, Juliet Marillier (Pan Macmillan Australia)
  • Fireborn, Keri Arthur (Hachette Australia)
  • This Shattered World, Amie Kaufman & Meagan Spooner (Allen & Unwin)
  • The Lascar’s Dagger, Glenda Larke (Hachette Australia)
  • Afterworlds, Scott Westerfeld (Penguin Australia)
  • Daughters of the Storm, Kim Wilkins (Harlequin Enterprises Australia)

BEST FANTASY SHORT STORY

  • “St Dymphna’s School for Poison Girls”, Angela Slatter (The Review of Australian Fiction Volume 9, Issue 3)
  • “The Oud”, Thoraiya Dyer (Long Hidden)
  • “Teratogen”, Deborah Kalin (Cemetery Dance 5/14)
  • “The Ghost of Hephaestus”, Charlotte Nash (Phantazein)
  • “The Badger Bride”, Angela Slatter (Strange Tales IV)

BEST SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL

  • Peacemaker, Marianne de Pierres (Angry Robot)
  • Aurora: Meridian, Amanda Bridgeman (Momentum)
  • The White List, Nina D’Aleo (Momentum)
  • This Shattered World, Amie Kaufman & Meagan Spooner (Allen & Unwin)
  • Nil By Mouth, LynC (Satalyte)
  • Foresight, Graham Storrs (Momentum)

BEST SCIENCE FICTION SHORT STORY

  • “Wine, Women and Stars”, Thoraiya Dyer (Analog 1-2/14)
  • “The Executioner Goes Home”, Deborah Biancotti (Review of Australian Fiction Vol 11 Issue 6)
  • “The Glorious Aerybeth”, Jason Fischer (On Spec 9/14)
  • “Dellinger”, Charlotte Nash (Use Only As Directed)
  • “Happy Go Lucky”, Garth Nix (Kaleidoscope)

BEST HORROR NOVEL

  • Razorhurst, Justine Larbalestier (Allen & Unwin)
  • Obsidian, Alan Baxter (HarperVoyager)
  • Book of the Dead, Greig Beck (Momentum)

 

BEST HORROR SHORT STORY

  • Home and Hearth, Angela Slatter (Spectral)
  • “The Executioner Goes Home”, Deborah Biancotti (Review of Australian Fiction Vol 11 Issue 6)
  • “Skinsuit”, James Bradley (Island Magazine #137)
  • “By the Moon’s Good Grace”, Kirstyn McDermott (Review of Australian Fiction Vol 12 Issue 3)
  • “Shay Corsham Worsted”, Garth Nix (Fearful Symmetries)

BEST YOUNG ADULT NOVEL

  • The Cracks in the Kingdom, Jaclyn Moriarty (Pan Macmillan Australia)
  • The Astrologer’s Daughter, Rebecca Lim (Text)
  • Afterworld, Lynnette Lounsbury (Allen & Unwin)
  • Clariel, Garth Nix (Allen & Unwin)
  • The Haunting of Lily Frost, Nova Weetman (UQP)
  • Afterworlds, Scott Westerfeld (Penguin Australia)

BEST YOUNG ADULT SHORT STORY

  • “Vanilla”, Dirk Flinthart (Kaleidoscope)
  • In Hades, Goldie Alexander (Celapene)
  • “Falling Leaves”, Liz Argall (Apex 5/14)
  • “The Fuller and the Bogle”, David Cornish (Tales from the Half-Continent)
  • “Signature”, Faith Mudge (Kaleidoscope)

BEST CHILDREN’S FICTION

  • Shadow Sister, Carole Wilkinson (Black Dog)
  • Slaves of Socorro, John Flanagan (Random House Australia)
  • Ophelia and the Marvellous Boy, Karen Foxlee (Hot Key)
  • The Last Viking Returns, Norman Jorgensen & James Foley (Fremantle)
  • Withering-by-Sea, Judith Rossell (ABC)
  • Sunker’s Deep, Lian Tanner (Allen & Unwin)

BEST COLLECTION

  • The Female Factory, Lisa L. Hannett & Angela Slatter (Twelfth Planet)
  • Secret Lives, Rosaleen Love (Twelfth Planet)
  • Angel Dust, Ian McHugh (Ticonderoga)
  • Difficult Second Album: more stories of Xenobiology, Space Elevators, and Bats Out Of Hell, Simon Petrie (Peggy Bright)
  • The Bitterwood Bible and Other Recountings, Angela Slatter (Tartarus)
  • Black-Winged Angels, Angela Slatter (Ticonderoga)

BEST ANTHOLOGY

  • Kaleidoscope, Alisa Krasnostein & Julia Rios, eds. (Twelfth Planet)
  • Kisses by Clockwork, Liz Grzyb, ed. (Ticonderoga)
  • Amok, Dominica Malcolm, ed. (Solarwyrm)
  • Reach for Infinity, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Solaris)
  • Fearsome Magics, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Solaris)
  • Phantazein, Tehani Wessely, ed. (FableCroft)

BEST GRAPHIC NOVEL/ILLUSTRATED WORK

  • Mr Unpronounceable and the Sect of the Bleeding Eye, Tim Molloy (Milk Shadow)
  • Left Hand Path #1, Jason Franks & Paul Abstruse (Winter City)
  • Awkwood, Jase Harper (Milk Shadow)
  • “A Small Wild Magic”, Kathleen Jennings (Monstrous Affections)
  • The Game, Shane W. Smith (Deeper Meanings)

The Night Terrace team was awarded the Convenors’ Award for Excellence.

Winners were announced on April 12, 2015 at the annual Aurealis Awards ceremony at the Great Hall, University House, Australian National University, Canberra. 

Günter Grass (1927-2015)

Author Günter Grass, 87, died April 13, 2015 in a hospital in Lübeck, Germany, where he’d lived for many years. Grass was a Nobel Prize-winning author of novels and poetry who occasionally made use of the fantastic in his work, an approach he called “broadened reality.” Notable examples include The Tin Drum (1959) and The Rat (1986).

Günter Wilhelm Grass was born October 16, 1927 in Danzig (now Gdańsk, in Poland), one of the first cities taken by the Nazis in WWII. Grass claimed for most of his life that he’d done no service in the German military during the war, until revealing in 2006 that he’d joined the Waffen-SS in 1944: “What I had accepted with stupid pride of youth I wanted to conceal after the war out of a recurrent sense of shame.” He was taken prisoner by the Allies at war’s end, and released in 1946.

After the war Grass studied sculpture and graphic design, but his focus soon turned to writing. He published more than 20 books throughout the course of his career, and was also a playwright and illustrator. Grass received the Nobel Prize for literature in 1999.

Grass  is survived by second wife Ute Grunert, four children from his first marriage, two stepsons from his second marriage, two additional children, and 18 grandchildren.

Clarke Award Shortlist

The six titles on the Arthur C. Clarke Award shortlist for best science fiction novel published in 2014  have been announced:

  • The Girl With All The Gifts, M.R. Carey (Orbit)
  • The Book Of Strange New Things, Michel Faber  (Canongate)
  • Europe In Autumn, Dave Hutchinson (Solaris)
  • Memory Of Water, Emmi Itäranta  (HarperVoyager)
  • The First Fifteen Lives Of Harry August, Claire North (Orbit)
  • Station Eleven, Emily St. John Mandel (Picador)

This year’s judges are Duncan Lawie and Nicholas Whyte for the British Science Fiction Association, Sarah Brown and Lesley Hall for the Science Fiction Foundation, and Leila Abu El Hawa for SCI-FI-LONDON. Andrew M. Butler is chair of judges. Tom Hunter is awards director.

The winner will receive a £2015 prize and a commemorative engraved bookend. The winning title will be announced May 6, 2015, at an award ceremony held at Foyles Bookshop, London, as part of the lead-up to the SCI-FI-LONDON Film Festival.


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