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Archive for 'Books'

Adrienne Martini reviews Bob Proehl

From Locus Magazine’s December 2016 issue


I thought I knew what Bob Proehl’s A Hundred Thousand Worlds would be about be­fore I even cracked the spine. It’s about comic book conventions, the blurbs on the back said…

Paul Di Filippo reviews David Brin & Stephen W. Potts

Special to Locus Online


David Brin’s The Transparent Society (1998) surveyed the new technology that is driving us towards more and more disclosure, and drew fresh new conclusions about the issues. Now, still cogitating on the ramifications of these issues, and displaying admirable tenacity and dedication to the cause, Brin offers an anthology of fiction on the topic, featuring a stellar lineup of contributors.

Paul Di Filippo reviews Gordon Eklund

Special to Locus Online


Few occasions give more pleasure to a reader than witnessing the unexpected return to print of a long-silent author who once had a rewarding, admirable career. This time around, the satisfaction derives from the appearance of Cosmic Fusion, by Gordon Eklund.

Gary K. Wolfe reviews Emmi Itäranta

From Locus Magazine’s December 2016 issue


The Weaver, published earlier this year in England under the far more evocative title The City of Woven Streets, is the second novel from the Finnish writer Emmi Itäranta, whose post-apocalyptic SF novel The Memory of Water deservedly gained attention a couple of years ago, largely because of her evocative, lyrical prose (she apparently writes simultaneously in Finnish and English). That prose serves her well in The Weaver

Paul Di Filippo reviews Henry Kuttner

Special to Locus Online


Nearly seven hundred pages of fiction by Kuttner from the short span of 1937 to 1940 finds the Golden Age Master even more deft and wide-ranging than in that first volume, Terror in the House… The sure hand and clever wit that would be fully on display under John Campbell’s Golden Age guidance appear in stronger and more lasting flashes here.

John Langan reviews Ray Cluley

From Locus Magazine’s December 2016 issue


Ray Cluley’s Probably Monsters was one of the standouts of 2015, a collection of well-written stories about a variety of monsters in a variety of landscapes. His follow-up publication, the standalone novella, Within the Wind, Beneath the Snow, is another success.

Faren Miller reviews Erika Johansen

From Locus Magazine’s December 2016 issue


Tackling both utopia and epic fantasy in a trilogy with divided timelines, multiple perspectives, and a wild genre mix, Johansen may not reach [Aldous] Huxley’s satiric heights. Nonetheless, the work is genuinely subversive: social commentary in the guise of supernatural adventure.

Paul Di Filippo reviews Three Lost World Novels

Special to Locus Online


The Lost World genre still remains readable, however, if we merely suspend our disbelief a little harder than with other genres. And thanks to Greg Luce at Armchair Fiction, we can enjoy new editions of some lesser-known classics from their “Lost World-Lost Race” series.

Gary K. Wolfe reviews Alastair Reynolds

From Locus Magazine’s November 2016 issue


Revenger is tremendous fun, with perhaps the most linear, straightforward, and kinetic plot of all Reynolds’s novels.

Paul Di Filippo reviews Robert Charles Wilson

Special to Locus Online


Robert Charles Wilson has crafted a novel that is at once shiny and futuristic and yet rousingly old-fashioned, considering its ambiance and character development, done up in the manner of a classic pre-modern adventure.


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