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Archive for 'Paul Di Filippo'

Paul Di Filippo reviews Poul Anderson

Special to Locus Online


The date range is almost identical to that of the selections in The Best of Gordon R. Dickson: Volume 1 that I reviewed earlier this month. And right up front, I believe we can make an important distinction along these lines. Poul Anderson was simply the better and more influential and consequential writer of the pair…

Paul Di Filippo reviews Allen Steele

Special to Locus Online


After being more or less defunct for decades, this seems to be Captain Future’s time to be reborn. The Captain’s retro yet timeless virtues — both the hero’s personal creed and the narrative stylings — are arguably congruent with cultural trends today toward a desired and desirable return to basics and old verities with a useful revisioning.

Paul Di Filippo reviews Gordon R. Dickson

Special to Locus Online


Dickson began publishing professionally in 1950, and this first volume of his Best Stories chronicles the years 1954 through 1964 — with one important exception. Editor Hank Davis has wisely and temptingly kicked off the collection with “Love Song,” the piece that Dickson sold to Harlan Ellison for Last Dangerous Visions, and which has been unseen since.

Paul Di Filippo reviews Caitlín R. Kiernan

Special to Locus Online


The heterogeneous tales assembled in this collection display Kiernan’s large but tightly interlocked range of interests. Outsiders, art, the elements, transcendence, sex, love, failure, responsibility.

Paul Di Filippo reviews Kim Stanley Robinson

Special to Locus Online


This book is amiable, humorous, good-natured, optimistic, in love with the quotidian and with the crazy quilt adaptive existence that life under stress assumes. Robinson gives us a host of fascinating, interlocking plots, and some of them have global resonance.

Paul Di Filippo reviews Paul La Farge

Special to Locus Online


Put most simplistically, it’s a novel examining the friendship between H. P. Lovecraft and his teenage pal, Robert Barlow, who became HPL’s literary executor. But it’s also much more than that, as we shall see.

Paul Di Filippo reviews Elan Mastai

Special to Locus Online


The first thing to note is that although Mastai might very well have been raised outside strict genre borders, he exhibits a playful fluency with, and is creatively savvy about, all the genre appurtenances and furniture. His does not make a single misstep with his speculations or language.

Paul Di Filippo reviews Richard Kadrey

Special to Locus Online


Lastly, and possibly the biggest attraction of the book, is the sheer language. Like S. J. Perelman writing for the Marx Brothers, combined with Raymond Chandler’s propensity for over-the-top similes and metaphors, Kadrey’s language pops off the page, whether as dialogue or description.

Paul Di Filippo reviews Norman Spinrad

Special to Locus Online


Spinrad revels in the juicy, sleazy, all-too-human Machiavellian machinations of all the parties, the rebels and the establishment alike. His ability to chart thrust and counter-thrust is akin to that of some television political strategist following the twists and turns of national affairs.

Paul Di Filippo reviews David Brin & Stephen W. Potts

Special to Locus Online


David Brin’s The Transparent Society (1998) surveyed the new technology that is driving us towards more and more disclosure, and drew fresh new conclusions about the issues. Now, still cogitating on the ramifications of these issues, and displaying admirable tenacity and dedication to the cause, Brin offers an anthology of fiction on the topic, featuring a stellar lineup of contributors.


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